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The Florida Winery

The Florida Winery

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

It won’t take long for you to realize that we do things a little bit differently around here. We refuse to accept that wine must taste of grass, tobacco, or dirt. Around here we like our wine like we like our women and ice tea…sweet! We don’t mess around when it comes to wine either, just check out the over 50 awards and medals we’ve won in our first four years!

All talk and no walk you say? Well pony up to our tasting bar and we will let our stunning selection of highly enjoyable libations walk all over your taste buds. Relish in pure unadulterated pleasure without worrying about how your swirling the glass. Sit back, Sip, Enjoy, Relax, Repeat…responsibly of course.

The winery is where the magic happens. All of our wines are made right here in house, just steps from the beach, where you’ll will find the most unique winery on earth. Beach real estate isn’t cheap, s0 we squeeze a lot of wine out of a small space: about 900 square feet! We use three 2,000-liter jacket fermentation tanks and nine 2,000-liter racking and aging tanks. Filtering is handled by our 40-plate plate & frame filter, and all the bottling is done by hand right in the front window.

It’s not a lot of room, but it’s enough for us to create the most amazing libations known to man.

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Tieton Cider Works

Tieton Cider Works

Monday, April 2, 2012

The fruit that is used in Tieton Cider Works Cider comes from Craig and Sharon Campbell’s Harmony Orchards. This land has been in our family since the 1920s, when our grandfather homesteaded it here in Tieton, Washington. It has been farmed organically for the last 25 years by an appreciative grandson.

The orchard is perched above the confluence of the Tieton and Naches rivers at an elevation of 2000 feet, considered high for a growing region in Washington State, giving us the advantage of growing our fruit at slightly cooler temperatures. The long sunny days, cool nights and fertile soils craft exceptionally great tasting apples, pears, cherries and apricots.

As a third generation Yakima Valley farmer with a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and 33 years’ experience in marketing produce, Craig has always been curious about the back-story: the history, production, science, and industry of food. From his unique vantage point, he has studied what consumers are looking for in an apple. Growing new varieties of trees is truly what makes Craig happy.

Ten years ago he started looking for niche apple varieties that weren’t being over- produced in the commercial market. As a result, land that was once predominantly planted with Red and Golden Delicious now has blocks of Ambrosia, Honey Crisp, Jonagold and Pinova Apples. Four years ago Craig started planting cider apples, those gnarly, inedible wild apple varieties needed to make great cider. We now have one of the larger acreages of cider apples and Perry pears in the state.

A love of land, food and drink has inspired us to make cider with the fruit we are growing at our ranch, Harmony Orchards.  We know the ciders we make are an expression of the harvest and reflective of the fruit and the place that it is grown.

We are excited to present these ciders to you. They are a blend of our own organically grown dessert apples and full-bodied traditional cider apples. Most of all we are thrilled to be involved in reinterpreting the tradition of cider making.

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Adytum Cellars

Adytum Cellars

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

A beekeeper since the age of fifteen, Vince Carlson still tends his own apiary (beehives). After fifteen years of learning about bees and honey, he discovered the ancient secret of mead. His first glass of mead, presented to him from a mead maker, sparked his passion and eventually gave birth to Adytum Cellars in 2002. Once he started making mead, it didn’t take long to realize the process was a wonderful way to preserve the freshness of fruit to enjoy year round.

Each year, Vince travels the Northwest visiting orchards and farms searching for the most striking and flavorful flowers, fruit and berries of the season. “I never know from year to year what kind of mead I will be making,” he says. “In one year peaches are best; another year it might be cherries or pears. The fruit trees and berry bushes decide what will make the best mead of the year.”

Just as grape varietals manifest different characteristics, so do honey varietals. The composition of each honey is unique to the floral source from which it originates. For example, Fireweed honey produces a dry, clean mead with stone and mineral notes. On the other hand, mead made from orange blossom honey  has a very fragrant bouquet and carries through with orchard citrus tones.

“Mead making combines the creative spontaneity of art and the quantitative predictability of science. It requires active involvement from both sides of the brain.”

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Maydelle Country Wines

Maydelle Country Wines

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

In the wonderful world that we live, there are thousands of wineries making tens of thousands of wines. It is in the midst of that wonderful world that you will find Maydelle Country Wines located solidly in Left Field.

The spirits of our rebellious forefathers, ambitious pioneers, and audacious grandparents reside at Maydelle Country Wines. Taking what they had and using it to grow this country is the spirit found in every bottle of our wines.

Maydelle Country Wines is located on a dirt road in a nearly 100-year-old depot. Using only products available from the soil of Texas, each batch is kept small — less than 200 gallons.  Instead of dragging up the same old French grapes, we go out on a limb creating wines that are not only pleasant to drink, but down right FUN: wines made from blackberries, grapefruit, elderberries, and peaches, just to name a few.

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Century Farm Winery

Century Farm Winery

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Agriculture remains a prominent part of West Tennessee and our farm represents that lasting history. Century Farm Winery is owned and operated by the same family that cleared the land on this working farm back in 1830. The Center for Historic Preservation designated the Spivey Farm as a Tennessee Century Farm, and hence the name: Century Farm Winery.

Today, visitors experience not only great wines, but true farm life, with rows of cotton and corn, as well as the vineyard’s roses and irises (the state flower) and daylily beds, which are scattered about the homestead.

 

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Alto Vineyards & Winery

Alto Vineyards & Winery

Thursday, August 18, 2011

The Renzaglia family welcomes you to Alto Vineyards and invites you to taste some of the finest wines produced in the United States. Our family-owned winery and vineyards is located in the foothills of the beautiful Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. Our second tasting room in Champaign, Illinois, is not far from the University of Illinois campus. Since our first vintage in 1988, our wines have won numerous medals in national and international wine competitions. The Renzaglia family philosophy is to produce the best possible wines in the Old World tradition, beginning in the vineyards, and finishing at your table.

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